Robert Mugabe caught sleeping during Ghana Independence Day celebration

A photo of Zimbabwe president allegedly sleeping at Ghana’s 60th Independence celebration has gone viral. The lethargy leader was among the many African leaders who graced the country’s 60 Independence Day anniversary parade.

Ghanaians took to social media to share various comments and observations from the former AU leader’s presence at the anniversary celebration.

”It’s funny my govt has money to send Mugabe to sleep in Ghana and no money to pay its workers. What is Mugabe going to bring from there? ” – Stolen Dreams @Mukoma59 said.

”We thought Mugabe was representing Zimbabwe in Ghana, he was sleeping. Mugabe has two vice presidents but he never let them do assignments. ” – Lucky @maDube_ said

Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe turns 93, vows to remain in power.

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe, the world’s oldest national ruler, turns 93 on Tuesday, defiantly vowing to remain in power despite growing signs of frailty and failing health.

He will celebrate with his staff in a private ceremony in Harare while supporters use state media to send their annual gushing messages of goodwill and congratulations.

The main celebrations will be held Saturday at Matobo National Park outside Bulawayo, Zimbabwe’s second-largest city, and are expected to attract thousands of officials and ZANU-PF party faithful.

Mugabe has ruled out any prospect of retiring soon, saying that ZANU-PF officials believe there is no “acceptable” alternative.

“The call to step down must come from my party… In such circumstances I will step down,” the state-owned Sunday Mail newspaper quoted Mugabe as saying in an interview aired late Monday.

“They want me to stand for elections… If I feel that I can’t do it any more, I will say so to my party so that they relieve me. But for now, I think I can’t say so,” he said.

“The majority of the people feel that there is no replacement, a successor who to them is acceptable,” Mugabe added.

The veteran leader came to power when Zimbabwe won independence in 1980 and his rule has been criticised for ruthless repression of dissent, election rigging, and for causing the country’s economic collapse.

– Advanced age –
Several incidents in recent years have highlighted his advanced age — including a fall in February 2015 at Harare airport.

In September of the same year he read a speech to parliament apparently unaware that he had delivered exactly the same address a month earlier.

Despite growing calls to step aside, his party has endorsed him as its candidate for general elections next year, and he remains widely respected as a liberation hero by other African leaders.

On Friday, his wife, Grace, claimed that Mugabe would be the voters’ choice even after he dies.

She has also vowed to use a wheelchair to transport him to election rallies if needed.

Mugabe has avoided naming a successor, and his party is divided between factions hoping to succeed him.

Grace, 51, was appointed head of the ruling party’s women’s wing in a surprise move that could make her a possible successor to Mugabe.

Another leading candidate is Mugabe’s vice president, Emmerson Mnangagwa.

Last year, security forces brutally quelled a series of street protests in Harare, a rare public expression of opposition to Mugabe’s regime.

According to Bloomberg News, Zimbabwe’s economic output has halved since 2000 when many white-owned farms were seized by ZANU-PF supporters, leaving the key agricultural sector in ruins.

 

Source: Guardian

“Give Donald Trump a chance”, says 93-year old Zimbabwean President, Robert Mugabe.

President Donald Trump should be given a chance to prove himself, Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe says.

He went on to express his support for Mr Trump’s America-first policy, saying “America for Americans” and “Zimbabwe for Zimbabweans”.

It is unusual for the veteran head of state to publicly back any US president.

The US imposed sanctions such as travel bans and an assets freeze on Mr Mugabe and his allies in 2001.

The sanctions were imposed over allegations of human rights abuses and election rigging.

Zimbabwe’s government says they caused the country’s economic collapse.

Most experts however blame Mr Mugabe’s seizure of white-owned farms, which used to be Zimbabwe’s economic backbone.

With Mr Trump’s reputation for being unconventional, Mr Mugabe is hoping his administration might decide to lift the sanctions.

“Give him time,” Zimbabwe’s leader said of Mr Trump in an interview aired ahead of his 93rd birthday on Tuesday.

“Mr Trump might even re-look [at] the sanctions on Zimbabwe.”

President Trump has caused global uproar over his policies, including his ban on people from seven mainly Muslim countries entering the US, although this has been overturned by the courts, and his pledge to rebuild the US economy on “America-first” principles.

Mr Mugabe is unfazed by such policies as he seems to identify with Mr Trump’s brand of nationalism.

“When it comes to Donald Trump… talking of American nationalism, well America for America, America for Americans – on that we agree. Zimbabwe for Zimbabweans,” Mr Mugabe said.

As far as the nonagenarian president is concerned, there is more hope with Mr Trump in the White House than if it had been Hilary Clinton.

“I was surprised by his election, but I did not like Madam Clinton to win either,” he said.

“I knew she could slap sanctions on us as a legacy.”

President Mugabe, Africa’s oldest head of state, also repeated that he is not ready to step down from power.

“The majority of the people feel that there is no replacement, successor who to them is acceptable, as acceptable as I am,” he told state media.

His Zanu-PF party has endorsed Mr Mugabe as its candidate in elections due next year.

Last week, first lady Grace Mugabe said if the party were to field his corpse, he would still win.

 

Source: BBC

Why Robert Mugabe Shouted “We Are Not Gays” In His UN Speech

Robert Mugabe, the 91-year-old leader of Zimbabwe, deviated slightly from his prepared remarks, during his Monday evening address to the United Nations General Assembly, to do something that he does frequently: slur against homosexuality. “We are not gays,” he shouted. And it’s worse than it sounds.

Mugabe made the comment in the course of a point about “double-standards,” which is usually dictator code for “I’m tired of Western countries calling out my human rights abuses,” and about “new rights,” which is usually code for “I long for the days when discrimination against certain groups was considered acceptable.”

Here’s the full quote, with the line he added at the podium in bold:

Respecting and upholding human rights is the obligation of all states, and is enshrined in the United Nations charter. Nowhere does the charter abrogate the right to some to sit in judgment over others, in carrying out this universal obligation. In that regard, we reject the politicization of this important issue and the application of double standards to victimize those who dare think and act independently of the self-anointed prefects of our time.

We equally reject attempts to prescribe “new rights” that are contrary to our values, norms, traditions, and beliefs. We are not gays! Cooperation and respect for each other will advance the cause of human rights worldwide. Confrontation, vilification, and double-standards will not.

Read More: vox