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Mark Zuckerberg defends Facebook over Donald Trump.

Facing criticism that fake news on Facebook aided the rise of Donald Trump, founder Mark Zuckerberg has strongly defended his network.

Speaking on stage at Techonomy, a technology conference in California, Zuckerberg said Facebook should not be held responsible.

“The idea that fake news on Facebook influenced the election in any way is a pretty crazy idea,” he said.

“If you believe that then I don’t think you have internalized the message Trump supporters are trying to send in this election.”

Some data has shown that fake stories were being far more widely shared on the platform than follow up stories debunking the claims.

For an increasing number of people, particularly Americans, Facebook is becoming the primary source of news coverage.

The site’s News Feed is specifically designed to show users content it thinks will be of most interest, creating what some describe as a “filter bubble” that reinforces a person’s view without injecting differences in opinion.

Earlier this year, Facebook was accused of being anti-Trump after it was alleged its human moderators were favouring liberal stories from appearing in people’s “trending stories” box.

While denying that claim, the site did sack its human team, instead relying solely on an algorithm to determine which stories were shown to be most popular, reports the BBC.

As a consequence, stories which were later proved entirely false appeared on the timelines of a large number of users, reports the BBC.

When asked about checks and balances needed to keep a company like Facebook in line, Zuckerberg said it was about “listening to what people want”.

“My goal, and what I care about, is giving people the power to share so we can make the world more open and connected. That requires building a good version of News Feed. We still have work to do on that. We’re going to keep improving it.

“On the community guidelines, I think as norms change and people want to see more news, I think we’ll have to continue to evolve the guidelines to reflect the value that the community holds.”

At the same event, Zuckerberg offered an optimistic view of Trump’s presidency, saying that his goals of improving global healthcare and connectivity did not necessarily require the co-operation of government.

God will punish Mark Zuckerberg for removing Radio Biafra from Facebook – IPOB

The Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB) has accused Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, of allegedly ordering the removal of the Radio Biafra page from his platform.

IPOB told Zuckerberg that God will set an example with him for aligning with President Buhari to oppress them.

The group also accused the Facebook owner of suppressing freedom of speech and expression, adding that he will see the judgement of God upon him.

IPOB in a statement obtained from Daily Post, said “Mark Zuckerberg, a Jew, who should know about the horrors of fascism and genocide, is helping an Islamist Buhari to continue the mass murder of innocent Biafrans.

“Radio Biafra London before its shut down by Zuckerberg who visited Buhari recently, was the biggest and most vibrant discussion forum on facebook with nearly 1 million members.

“Why a man whose family benefited from the freedoms and opportunities the land of the free USA had to offer can turn around to brutally suppress freedom of speech and expression is beyond human understanding.

“Facebook has made itself the wiling tool of repressive regimes and psychopathic murderers in power such as Major-General Muhammadu Buhari the Nigerian ruler.

“Mark Zuckerberg must know that the day he cut the deal with Buhari at Aso Rock his Facebook satellite was destroyed at the launch pad.

“That was a sign from the Most High that he should stay out of this battle between good and evil. Now that you have sided with the Devil, Mr. Zuckerberg, you will see the judgement of God upon you.

“The God we serve will set an example with you that mankind may know that HE is the God of Biafrans. If you do not turn back from your evil ways.

“Look at Nigeria today and know that God’s anger is upon her and her leaders because they dared to arrest Nnamdi Kanu. Satlink Israel lost their satellite because Buhari persuaded them to remove Radio Biafra satellite radio broadcast from their services.

“Nobody comes against IPOB and survives it. We urge you to retrace your steps and reinstall Radio Biafra London Facebook group.”

Mark Zuckerberg met with President Buhari and Vice President Yemi Osinbajo at the Presidential Villa on September 2, 2016.

Nigerian startup wins Facebook-sponsored innovation challenge

Godwin Benson, a Nigerian tech entrepreneur, has won the Internet.org innovation challenge for education.

Benson is the creator of Tuteria Nigeria, an online platform that links up those interested in learning to potential tutors.

Mark Zuckerberg, who met with Benson during his visit to Nigeria, shared news of the innovator’s achievement.

Besides Benson, five other tech startups emerged winners of the innovation challenge.

They are; Esoko, Hyperion Development, MPedigree Goldkeys, SaferMom, and mPharma Mutti.

Zuckerberg wrote: “Last month in Abuja, Nigeria, I met Godwin Benson. Godwin founded Tuteria Nigeria, an online platform that connects people seeking to learn with people nearby who can teach them.

“Tuteria Nigeria won one of six awards for the Internet.org Innovation Challenge for services that provide education and economic development opportunities across the African continent.

“These services are all examples of the great work being done by entrepreneurs across the African continent to strengthen their communities and create opportunity.

“Congratulations to the winners and all the other entrepreneurs who are doing this important work”, said Zuckerberg.

Internet.org is a partnership between social networking services company Facebook and six companies (Samsung, Ericsson, MediaTek, Opera Software, Nokia and Qualcomm) that plans to bring affordable access to selected internet services to less developed countries.

Reuben Abati : The Mark Zuckerberg Visit

Read his piece below…
Mark Zuckerberg’s two-day visit to Nigeria has done a lot for the country; it is a pity no government official or agency has tried to tap into the gains of that visit. He arrived at a time there was much talk about economic recession, concerns about companies folding up or retrenching staff, or international investors leaving the country in droves, out of frustration with the uncertainties in the system.
Zuckerberg’s arrival raised our hopes: co-founder of Facebook and the 5th richest man in the world, sneaked into Nigeria to meet with developers and entrepreneurs and to discuss investments in Nigeria’s growing start-up ecosystem. And for two days, he went round the city of Lagos, visiting start-ups and interacting with young entrepreneurs.

The way Nigeria is often painted abroad, and in those travel advisories that foreign ministries issue, you would think Nigeria is such an unsafe place where kidnappers are permanently on the prowl. Zuckerberg helped to show the rest of the world that Nigeria is not so bad at all, and that something really exciting is happening here among the country’s young population. He had no bodyguards. He did not have to hire a lorry load of Nigerian policemen to keep watch over him. He trekked on the streets of Lagos, surrounded by a few of his hosts. On Wednesday morning, he jogged across the Ikoyi-Lekki bridge. He ate pounded yam, shrimps, snails (I thought they said he is a vegan!) and jollof rice (Nigerian jollof (!) not that one from Ghana). His visit went smoothly. More investors may well be encouraged to visit Nigeria too, seeing how confidently a whole $53.7 billion walked freely about in Nigeria, and he was not stolen or kidnapped.

Zuckerberg’s visit also provided great publicity for Nigeria’s emerging Silicon Valley, and the young entrepreneurs to whom Zuckerberg paid compliments. He has already invested in a Nigerian start-up, Andela, and he has made friends with other young Nigerians, the guys behind Jobberman and C-Creation Hub (CcHUB) and so many others. Zuckerberg cut the picture throughout his visit of a true inspirational figure. His simplicity and humility was impressive. He kept going about in a T-shirt, and interacted freely with everyone he met.

Many young Nigerians can learn from his example: the way some people whose biggest possession is a laptop sometimes carry their shoulders in the sky, if they were to be half of what Zuckerberg is, they won’t just claim that they are voltrons or overlords, they will look for more intimidating labels. But Mark Zuckerberg, who is just 32, shows that it is not all about money, or influence, character matters. There is no doubt that his hosts were also impressed with him.  And that probably explains the protest that greeted the attempt by CNN International and American artiste, Tyrese Gibson, to refer to the visit as Zuckerberg’s visit to sub-Saharan Africa. Young Nigerians kept shouting back that Zuckerberg is in Nigeria, not sub-Saharan Africa! They wanted the publicity for their country.

Inspired by Zuckerberg’s visit as the tech entrepreneurs in Nigeria’s Silicon Valley may have been, the Nigerian government should see in the visit, and the excitement that it has generated, the need to provide greater support for technological innovation in the country. There are many young Nigerians out there who are gifted, hardworking and innovative. They belong to the 21st Century. They are aggressive. They want to operate at the international level and become superstars. They have ideas. They are ready and willing. The basic thing that government owes them is to provide an enabling environment for their talents to flower. It has taken a few young men and ladies to bring Mark Zuckerberg to Nigeria. There are other young Nigerians doing wonderful things in other sectors of the economy who can save this country if they are given the chance. There is also a large army of untapped and yet-to-be-discovered talents, whose future we cannot afford to waste. Investment in education will help. Uncommon sense will make things happen.

Zuckerberg’s visit also did a lot for Nollywood. He described Nollywood as “a national treasure”. That statement should be framed and sent to every major agency in the private and public sectors in Nigeria. He may not yet have invested in Nollywood, but there was no doubt that the members of Nollywood and other celebrities who met with him appreciated their being recognized by one of the most successful young men of the 21st century. I watch Nollywood movies, but I don’t think I have ever seen those Nollywood stars who met with Zuckerberg smile that heartily and broadly – not even in the movies. The ones who did not bare their 32, were staring at the Facebook ambassador in that typical Nigerian fashion: “ah, see money, Mark, abi make I send you script make you sponsor?” 

The way the visit went, if Mark Zuckerberg had wanted a Nigerian wife, or girlfriend, he would have been met at every turn with echoes of “Yes, Yes, Yes…come and hold something.” But he is already married. So, don’t worry, Priscilla Chan (Mark’s wife), your husband is safe, Nigerian ladies will only admire him, they don’t mean any harm, and they won’t initiate him into coded runs.  But of course you trust him – you know he is not Justin Bieber. But money is good oh. After money, it is money. Ha, Ori lonise, eda ko la’ropin o, Edumare funmi ni money… 

Altogether, it was a great business outing for Zuckerberg and Facebook. Over 16 million Nigerians are on Facebook, it is the largest and most influential social media platform in the country; on a daily basis, over 7 million Nigerians log onto the website. Many more are on whatsapp, another Facebook acquired platform. With Zuckerberg’s visit, that number is bound to grow.  The strategic friendships and partnerships that he has been able to build is a demonstration of power and influence: Facebook is on the ground in Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, and he has taken that further by visiting Kenya – look beyond the T-shirt, this young American billionaire is building constituencies and spheres of influence across Africa; he is exploring new markets and staying ahead of the competition in a continent that many other investors may overlook, or desert for reasons of inconvenience.

As a business strategy, Mark Zuckerberg’s exploration of the African market is brilliant. It may be the subject someday of a Management, Leadership and Marketing Class. Businesses must innovate, innovate and innovate and the best way to do that is through people.  Nigerian entrepreneurs have a lot to learn in this regard: the mindset of the business leader is the soul of strategy. There are too many thermostatic leaders in the Nigerian business environment, and that is why at the slightest confrontation with hard choices, they close shop and run. Here is Mark Zuckerberg, in the face of proven recession, he wants to support start-ups and SMEs in Nigeria; at a time others are fleeing, he is coming into Nigeria and Africa. He is smart. Wicked problems in a business environment should inspire genius, change and innovation. That is what leadership is all about.

Beyond business and culture, there was a small political side to the Zuckerberg visit. The Facebook CEO had said Facebook will promote the use of Hausa Language, some reports indicated he had said he loves Hausa language, and then a storm followed, resulting in a hot, healthy spat between two friends, colleagues and brothers of mine, Femi Fani-Kayode (@realFFK) and Reno Omokri (@renoomokri), with one claiming that Americans are promoting Northern hegemony (John Kerry, now Zuckerberg and Facebook), and the other saying it is not a big deal, and in the exchange, we got some lectures about Nigeria’s ethnic and hegemonic politics.

On Wednesday at a town hall meeting, Zuckerberg more or less edited himself by saying “I am glad we support Hausa, and we are planning on supporting more languages soon.” He didn’t specify what those other languages are. I hope he knows Nigeria has over 400 languages and ethnic groups, and they all form part of the Nigerian Facebook community. He should tread carefully here, because I am not too sure Facebook can adopt Yoruba language before Igbo, or vice versa, without a social media war on its hands, and if Facebook chooses to accommodate the three major languages in Nigeria, it could be confronted with a major battle over minority rights on its platform. We are like that in this country, Mark.

But the difference is that Mark Zuckerberg is not a politician, he has voted only once (in 2008) and he doesn’t make political statements, except when business interests are at stake. Eyin boys, FFK and Reno, Zuckerberg doesn’t really care about the local fights we fight: he wants to create new markets and if promoting Hausa on Facebook will create more customers in that part of Nigeria, so be it. And in case religion is part of that politics, it doesn’t concern him either, he was born Jewish, but he is a self-declared atheist. If he worships any religion, it is the religion of Facebook. In Nigeria, he has Igbos, Yorubas and other Nigerians working for him. (https://techpoint.ng/2016/08/31/nigerians-working-with-mark-zuckerberg-facebook/).

He is interested in their intellect not where they come from.  One more thing: The Nigerian government snubbed him or did he snub our government? When he got to Kenya, he was received at the airport by the Cabinet Secretary of Information and Communications and later given a delicious lunch of fish, semo and soup (https://techpoint.ng/2016/09/01/mark-zuckerberg-in-kenya/), no Nigerian government official offered him common sachet water and yet he was here to create jobs and markets! We shouldn’t frighten him away with our politics! The good news, though, is that he is a humanist even if a secular humanist: End of story.

Thank you Marky, for the visit and for giving us a good story to tell.

See How Mark Zuckerberg Responded To Kanye West’s Request For Money

Mark Zuckerberg has responded to Kanye West’s ask for money in the most subtle way possible.

The father of Facebook appeared to issue an indirect message by liking a message posted by a former software engineer at the firm.

mark zuckerberg

Steven Grimm wrote: “Dear Kanye West: If you’re going to ask the CEO of Facebook for a billion dollars, maybe don’t do it on Twitter.”

Credit: HuffPost

Zuckerberg & Wife Donate $25M to CDC for Ebola

 Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, are donating $25 million to the CDC Foundation to help address the Ebola epidemic. The money will be used by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Ebola response effort in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and elsewhere in the world where Ebola is a threat, the foundation said Tuesday.

The grant follows a $9 million donation made by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen last month. Zuckerberg and Chan are making the grant from their fund at the nonprofit Silicon Valley Community Foundation.

“We need to get Ebola under control in the near term so that it doesn’t spread further and become a long term global health crisis that we end up fighting for decades at large scale, like HIV or polio,” Zuckerberg wrote on his Facebook page on Tuesday. “We believe our grant is the quickest way to empower the CDC and the experts in this field to prevent this outcome.”

“The most important step we can take is to stop Ebola at its source. The sooner the world comes together to help West Africa, the safer we all will be,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden in a statement.

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