I’m Not On Exile- Jonathan

Former President Goodluck Jonathan has dismissed a report that he is on exile in Cote d’Ivoire.

The report, published yesterday by a national newspaper, claimed that Dr. Jonathan had been given asylum in that Francophone country. His associates were alarmed at the report.

But Dr. Jonathan yesterday said it was all false. He said on the phone: “I’m not on exile. I have no cause to go on exile. It is a wicked and malicious report.

“I was Vice President for two years and President for six years. I did everything I could and I served my country very well. This is what they keep saying anytime I’m outside the country. I was in Ecuador; they said I was on exile. This is my second time in Cote d’Ivoire and I’m rounding off my visit.

“It is a wicked attempt to link me with the renewed Niger Delta crisis.”

Also yesterday, Dr. Jonathan told his former cabinet members that he was not on exile in Cote d’Ivoire.

He said he could not have been running away from any problem in the country let alone going on exile.

The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) said although Jonathan had been implicated in all transactions under its investigation, the ex-President was not yet its target.

The Federal Government is said to be looking into the rumour.

One of the intelligence agencies is believed to have sent its operatives to Cote d’Ivoire to verify the report.

According to a former Minister of National Planning, Prof. Suleiman Olanrewaju Abubakar, the ex-President spoke with him and others from Abidjan, following the report.

Abubakar said Jonathan was only in transit in Cote d’Ivoire being his second visit to the West African nation since he left office.

He said Jonathan actually spent his Christmas break in Cote d’Ivoire and his visit to “this country is not new”.

The ex-minister quoted Jonathan as saying: “I am not on exile, I can never be on exile, I am going to come back to Nigeria.

“I cannot run away from any problem, I am going to face whatever problem that exists in Nigeria.”

Abubakar added: “The ex-President assured me and others that he was only in transit in Cote d’Ivoire which he has visited thrice since handing over power to President  Muhammadu Buhari.”

Credit: TheNation

Burkina Ex-president Compaore in Exile in Morocco, Says Ivory Coast Govt

Burkina Faso’s longtime president Blaise Compaore, toppled by a popular uprising last month, has left his temporary refuge of Ivory Coast and headed into exile in Morocco, an Ivorian government spokesman said on Thursday.

Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in Burkina Faso when Compaore, who originally seized power in a 1987 coup, tried to change the constitution through parliament to extend his 27-year grip on the West African state.

He fled to neighbouring Ivory Coast, where he was welcomed by President Alassane Ouattara, a close ally, and lodged in a state villa in the capital Yamoussoukro.

“Yes, he has decided to change locations. He has left for Morocco. He will always be welcome in Ivory Coast. Our doors are always open,” Ivorian government spokesman Bruno Kone told Reuters, without giving further details.

Burkina Faso’s military briefly took power after Compaore stepped down. A civilian interim president, Michel Kafando, was appointed this week to guide the country on the southern fringes of the Sahara desert to an election due next year.

Credit: Reuters

Ebola: Liberians on Forced Exile

Henry Boley left Liberia to attend a conference in Nigeria just days after his twins were born. Now, weeks later, he can’t get home. Amanda Johnson, a 50-year-old Liberian living in Ghana, awaits her fiance’s departure from their home country for their wedding, but refuses to return home because of Ebola.

Hundreds of Liberians are stranded in Ghana, separated from their families because of poverty, fear and logistics. Some are waiting for flights to resume after most airlines cancelled flights to Liberia. Others are having trouble navigating or affording the circuitous route back by bus. Many others feel it’s too risky to return home, even if their spouses or children are desperately urging them to.

Boley and Johnson are neighbors in a camp for refugees just outside Accra, the Ghanaian capital, where they monitor the news for any signs that Ebola is slowing down in their home country. Their exile is likely to continue as the worst outbreak of the disease in history continues infecting more people in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, with a total death toll of more than 4,500.

Ghana, which is still free of Ebola, has become the hub for an intensified international response to the crisis, with the U.N. Mission for Ebola Emergency Response based in Accra. Ghana is one of 14 West African counties seen as being at risk, and authorities have set up at least three Ebola isolation centers across the country in case there is an outbreak.

Boley, a 40-year-old Christian pastor, has been stranded for weeks. He is bored and often thinks of his babies, whom he barely knows.

“I have been trying to get back to Liberia but it’s very difficult,” he said. “This is tough for me. I am the man of the home and when I talk to my wife she says to me that I need to be there. But I can’t do anything for her.”

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